Horseman Peter Campbell Dies

The horsemanship world gave a collective gasp last week as it lost one of its own. Peter Campbell, an accomplished horseman from Alberta, Canada, who sought out Ray Hunt and Tom Dorrance and honed his expertise at several large ranch operations before eventually settling in Wheatland, Wyoming, died suddenly last week. He was 52 and had been traveling from a recent clinic in Kentucky.

Campbell died of a self-inflicted injury along the highway near Vonore, Tennessee, confirmed Vonore Police Chief Randy Kirkland. He leaves behind his wife, horsewoman Trina Campbell.

Thousands of friends and fans remembered him as one who helped riders and horses make enormous strides where others had failed. He was generously and uniformly praised for his excellence and for his advocacy of the vaquero method of training.

Campbell traveled internationally as a clinician, has been featured in numerous horsemanship magazines, competed at the Buck Brannaman Pro Am Roping event, authored the book “Willing Partners,” and had an instructional DVD series. There will be a memorial service for Campbell at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alberta, on April 15, 2-5 pm in the Van Horn ballroom.

Campbell follower Elizabeth David, of Cheboygan, Michigan, wrote this remembrance:

“Not for me, for him, for the horse.”

Peter could always make a profound change in a horse, but he also made profound changes in people. Using the same feel that made him an artist on horseback, he would set up an idea and let people seek it, find it.

Never did he discourage a try, taking his time where he could, adding some pressure only where it was needed. He taught people to seek, to learn, to feel. To come together and help each other to get the job done. Peter Campbell was a creator of true horsemen and horsewomen. That was his gift to us, to the horse.

Photo by Kent Reeves