Lady Bits: Undies & Oww-ies

Several women shared their Lady Bits & Riding experiences. Thank you and keep ’em coming! Contact us here if you’d like to share.

Writes a rider from Colorado:

What a great subject! At age 50, I’m fairly new to riding. I have an Arabian mare and am studying reining and ranch versatility with a trainer. In my short adult riding career, one interesting Lady Bits moment to share in hopes of helping others: I rather suddenly developed a small, very tender spot on the vulva (the area immediately external to the vagina). It ached all the time. I knew it wasn’t a cyst (which I’d gotten in the same place from cycling, years ago).

I went to gynecologist and it turns out that I’d grown a skin tag, which she removed with a bit of anesthetic. Her recommendation was to choose underwear wisely: anything with a thick edge to it, or a thong, because of its narrowness, can move around while riding and rub. The friction can cause an irritation.

Now, I wear a ‘boy short’ which puts the elasticized leg edge well away from anything tender and doesn’t have bulky seams. I’ve had no further problems.

Writes another rider from North Carolina:

I wear boy shorts or athletic undies to ride in. I never go commando (no undies at all). I tried that once and my crotch hurt for about a week. I always always wear cotton undies which can be unbelievably hard to find. Also, when riding all day, I often change socks and undies at lunchtime.

CR RanchWear Shirts Shine

I was skeptical when I first visited with CR Ranch Wear about their shirts. Yes, they’re made in America. Yes, they’re beautiful. Yes, they fit exponentially better than your average shirt.

But will a shirt change my day?

Will it change how people consider me?

Will it change how I consider myself?

Turns out, a nice shirt does makes all the difference. Read more about CR RanchWear here.

CR shirts are especially made for women performing with their horses in competitions. Gals select specific shirts to match their horse and their horse’s tack. Ashley Flynn, for instance, looks spiffy in this rich blue CR shirt and her dark horse, Smooth Sailing Cat. (see photo at right)

I’m not much for shows and competitions, but I did wear my CR shirts to the Four States Agriculture Expo where NickerNews and BestHorsePractices staffed a booth for three days.

I’m used to these events and have a reliable sense of booth reactions and interactions. You only have a few seconds to make a good impression and pique people’s interest. That job was made infinitely easy with CR’s stylish shirts.

I had scores of conversations and I’d guess most of them were initiated because visitors noticed the shirt first (and, no, it wasn’t because of any big chest under the shirt. That doesn’t exist.)

I wore a brown and white striped CR Tradition shirt with contrasting collar and cuffs, made of Italian cotton, on Day One and a CR Tradition of an exclusive Tropical Green weave on Day Two. Both were size Small (Most CR shirts come in six sizes, from XXS to XL)

See photos below for Before and After images.

CR RanchWear shirts are not shirts to wear doing barn chores. They are well-made, colorful performance shirts and made for your A Game. They can take the place of that drab blazer and striped tee shirt combo you’ve been sporting for, well, forever. They take the place of that stiff blouse and cardigan ensemble.

Concerned that it’s just one layer? If you must, wear a thermal camisole or tank top  underneath. But try not to cover up these shirts. They weren’t made for that.

Fun and Easy Trekking with GAIA

Of all the phone application options for trail and backcountry riders, the map app, GAIA GPS, has been the most referenced by horse riders I meet. They love it and use it religiously for their afternoon or weeklong adventures.

GAIA (according to Greek mythology, Gaia is Earth personified as a goddess) is a map app with which you can track, log your route, and follow a waypoint, all without using cellular data. GAIA simply uses with the GPS chip in your phone.

Cellular data use is problematic on a few fronts:

— it’s expensive

— it’s often not available when you most need it, like when riding in the backcountry.

GAIA solves both issues, as long as you have “Location Services” in your settings enabled for the app.

There are just a few things that are essential to remember when using GAIA:

  • Be prepared and download those maps of country where you’ll traveling in advance and when you have a wifi connection.
  • At the very least, get comfortable reading topographic maps and traveling by compass direction. When traveling in the backcountry, no app will save you. But having some basic Boy Scout skills will.
  • At the very least, spend time with GAIA to familiarize yourself with its many excellent features. This is not like using texting or the camera. It may take some exploring and experimenting to fully use and take advantage of it.

Check out these helpful features on using GAIA from Bikepacking and an Adventure blog.

Here’s a feature on map reading with a tutorial on how to read a topographical map.

The GAIA Pro version offers new elements of customization and functionality. If you’d like to try it, GAIA is offering our readers a FREE one-year subscription of GAIA PRO. To learn more, email support@gaiagps.com and mention NickerNews or ColoradoOutsider.

Happy Trails!

Horseman Peter Campbell Dies

The horsemanship world gave a collective gasp last week as it lost one of its own. Peter Campbell, an accomplished horseman from Alberta, Canada, who sought out Ray Hunt and Tom Dorrance and honed his expertise at several large ranch operations before eventually settling in Wheatland, Wyoming, died suddenly last week. He was 52 and had been traveling from a recent clinic in Kentucky.

Campbell died of a self-inflicted injury along the highway near Vonore, Tennessee, confirmed Vonore Police Chief Randy Kirkland. He leaves behind his wife, horsewoman Trina Campbell.

Thousands of friends and fans remembered him as one who helped riders and horses make enormous strides where others had failed. He was generously and uniformly praised for his excellence and for his advocacy of the vaquero method of training.

Campbell traveled internationally as a clinician, has been featured in numerous horsemanship magazines, competed at the Buck Brannaman Pro Am Roping event, authored the book “Willing Partners,” and had an instructional DVD series. There will be a memorial service for Campbell at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alberta, on April 15, 2-5 pm in the Van Horn ballroom.

Campbell follower Elizabeth David, of Cheboygan, Michigan, wrote this remembrance:

“Not for me, for him, for the horse.”

Peter could always make a profound change in a horse, but he also made profound changes in people. Using the same feel that made him an artist on horseback, he would set up an idea and let people seek it, find it.

Never did he discourage a try, taking his time where he could, adding some pressure only where it was needed. He taught people to seek, to learn, to feel. To come together and help each other to get the job done. Peter Campbell was a creator of true horsemen and horsewomen. That was his gift to us, to the horse.

Photo by Kent Reeves

The Return of Wild West Journalism

You might think we journalists struggle more than other folks when accusations of “fake news” and “alternative facts” splash across our virtual desktops.

That’s because the attack is not just on liberal news outlets but on media and the propagation of information in general. It’s an attack on journalism’s basic mission to fairly inform readers.

I may be a reporter but I’m also a reader. And when university research shows that most people think that we journalists are actually enemies of the state, well, let’s just say I can take a hint. (For those of you who are so darn persnickety about sources, I’m referring to the recent Suffolk University poll which shows that two-thirds of Fox News watchers believe that mainstream media is the enemy of the people.),

I’ve seen a lawyer! I’ve seen the light!

Party line! Party on!

Wild West journalism is so much more fun anyway. Remember when frontier reports promised water and farmland aplenty to any Easterner with an ear to bend? Remember when reports of “Gold in Them Thar Hills” was the real, honest-to-god headline on news stands?

Author Timothy Snyder reminded me of Wild West journalism in a recent interview. He said:

“In the descent from a world of factual discourse into a world of emotions and alternative realities, the first step you take… [is to] manufacture lots of stuff that isn’t true. The second step is that you claim that everyone is like this. You spread this kind of cynicism that you shouldn’t really trust anybody…Once that belief spreads we’re then in the world …which is ripe for fascism.”

His book is called “On Tyranny” and he teaches at Yale. But the guy lacks a sense of humor, don’t you think?

We need writers and reporters who are more easy-going and have better senses of humor. More and more, I look at my old journalism life and laugh.

I remember, for example, reporting on a large, intense animal cruelty case. Thanks to the coverage, the animal welfare officials investigated. Thanks to the coverage, the county District Attorney prosecuted. Scores of horses, goats, pigs, and other animals were removed from the abusers’ possession and the couple in question was convicted.

Not surprisingly, these folks did not appreciate the coverage and called it untrue and “fake news.”

I see their point of view now. More and more, the truth is just so much trouble. More and more, I prefer the news to reflect my social media newsfeed: sound bites and images that affirm my beliefs. No questioning or contrariness please. Embracing an ideology of doubt? No thanks!

When I was a young mom, I used to love meal times with my three sons. It was a time to bounce around ideas. I tried to extoll the French essayist Joseph Joubert: “The aim of an argument or discussion should be not victory but progress.”

Back then, I said.

— If we only listen to the news that makes us feel good, how do we grow?

— If journalists only write about approved topics with supportive bias, how is the reader (and therefore the greater society) helped?

— If we are not encouraged to ask questions, think critically, and occasionally argue, what’s the point of having a thinking brain and living in a community?

Back then, I thought that as reporters and readers we should be encouraged to dig deep, look for the sources’ angles, and weigh alternative points of view. We should be aware of conflicts of interests and ulterior motives. Abusers, people with something to hide, vested parties all routinely blame the messengers, I thought.

Around the dinner table and around the newsroom, I thought transparency and objectivity were good things. Discourse and shining the mirror back on ourselves? All good!

Now, thankfully, I’ve been liberated from the fray. If I was back at the table with my boys and they said something like “sticks and stones can break my bones, but names can never hurt me” I would scold them for not thinking about the math. You know – If A = B and B = C, then A = C. C’mon folks, learn it with me!

Discussion is Argument.

Argument is Verbal Combat.

Verbal Combat is Combat.

Combat is War.

War is bad.

We need more love in this world!

Some folks might say I’m slipping from Synder’s “fact-based discourse into an alternative reality promulgated mostly by emotions.”

But love is emotions, right? And even journalists want to be loved.

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